Watch a demo

Research Blog

October 13, 2021

Menopause Part 3: Increased Risk of Disease Associated with Menopause

Welcome to part 3 of the ODX Menopause Series. In this post, the ODX Research team identifies chronic conditions associated with the menopausal transition. Many of these disorders are preventable or reversible with appropriate nutrition and lifestyle interventions.  

The ODX Menopause Series

  1. Menopause Part 1: A Quick Overview of a Slow Process
  2. Menopause Part 2: Biology and Physiology of Menopause
  3. Menopause Part 3: Increased Risk of Disease Associated with Menopause
  4. Menopause Part 4: Identifying Menopause: Signs and Symptoms
  5. Menopause Part 5: Laboratory Evaluation of Menopause
  6. Menopause Part 6: Cardiovascular Risk in Menopause
  7. Menopause Part 7: Beyond Hormone Testing in Menopause
  8. Menopause Part 8: Natural Approaches to Menopause
  9. Menopause Part 9: Diet and Nutrition Intervention in Menopause
  10. Menopause Part 10: Characteristic of Herbal Derivatives used to Alleviate Menopause Symptoms
  11. Menopause Part 11: Lifestyle Approaches to Menopause
  12. Menopause Part 12: The National Institute on Aging Addresses Hot Flashes
  13. Menopause Part 13: Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) in Menopause
  14. Menopause Part 14: North American and European Guidelines for Hormonal Management of Menopause
  15. Menopause Part 15: Bioidentical Hormone Therapy
  16. Menopause Part 16: Optimal Takeaways for Menopause
  17. Optimal The Podcast - Episode 10

The relative deficiency of estradiol brought on by menopause triggers detrimental changes including dyslipidemia, decreased metabolic rate, increased central adiposity, and metabolic syndrome. These underlying physiological shifts can progress to more severe disease including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).[1]

Mitochondrial dysfunction also occurs in association with decreased circulating estrogen. This dysfunction leads to a decrease in lipid oxidation, increase in lipid storage, and the increased adiposity seen with menopause.[2]

A significant portion of a woman’s life may be spent in menopause. A primary objective should be to reduce risk of chronic disease and optimize health during this period. Preventative steps should be taken to address the most common disorders of concern including:[3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Cognitive decline
  • Dementia
  • Depression
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Endothelial dysfunction
  • Hormone-related cancers (e.g., breast and endometrial)
  • Hypertension
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Migraine
  • Musculoskeletal disorders
  • NAFLD
  • Obesity
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Vasomotor symptoms

References

[1] Gupte, Anisha A et al. “Estrogen: an emerging regulator of insulin action and mitochondrial function.” Journal of diabetes research vol. 2015 (2015): 916585. doi:10.1155/2015/916585 This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.

[2] Honour, John W. “Biochemistry of the menopause.” Annals of clinical biochemistry vol. 55,1 (2018): 18-33. doi:10.1177/0004563217739930

[3] Lobo, R A et al. “Prevention of diseases after menopause.” Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society vol. 17,5 (2014): 540-56. doi:10.3109/13697137.2014.933411

[4] Hale, Georgina E et al. “The perimenopausal woman: endocrinology and management.” The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology vol. 142 (2014): 121-31. doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2013.08.015

[5] Kostov, Krasimir, and Lyudmila Halacheva. “Role of Magnesium Deficiency in Promoting Atherosclerosis, Endothelial Dysfunction, and Arterial Stiffening as Risk Factors for Hypertension.” International journal of molecular sciences vol. 19,6 1724. 11 Jun. 2018, doi:10.3390/ijms19061724

[6] van Dijk, Gabriella M et al. “Health issues for menopausal women: the top 11 conditions have common solutions.” Maturitas vol. 80,1 (2015): 24-30. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.09.013

[7] Kruszyńska, Aleksandra, and Jadwiga Słowińska-Srzednicka. “Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) as a good predictor of time of menopause.” Przeglad menopauzalny = Menopause review vol. 16,2 (2017): 47-50. doi:10.5114/pm.2017.68591

[8] Gupte, Anisha A et al. “Estrogen: an emerging regulator of insulin action and mitochondrial function.” Journal of diabetes research vol. 2015 (2015): 916585. doi:10.1155/2015/916585 This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.

Tag(s): Conditions

Other posts you might be interested in